Three-wave mixing traveling-wave parametric amplifier with periodic variation of the circuit parameters

  1. Anita Fadavi Roudsari,
  2. Daryoush Shiri,
  3. Hampus Renberg Nilsson,
  4. Giovanna Tancredi,
  5. Amr Osman,
  6. Ida-Maria Svensson,
  7. Marina Kudra,
  8. Marcus Rommel,
  9. Jonas Bylander,
  10. Vitaly Shumeiko,
  11. and Per Delsing
We report the implementation of a near-quantum-limited, traveling-wave parametric amplifier that uses three-wave mixing (3WM). To favor amplification by 3WM, we use the superconducting
nonlinear asymmetric inductive element (SNAIL) loops, biased with a dc magnetic flux. In addition, we equip the device with dispersion engineering features to create a stop-band at the second harmonic of the pump and suppress the propagation of the higher harmonics that otherwise degrade the amplification. With a chain of 440 SNAILs, the amplifier provides up to 20 dB gain and a 3-dB bandwidth of 1 GHz. The added noise by the amplifier is found to be less than one photon.

Transmon qubit readout fidelity at the threshold for quantum error correction without a quantum-limited amplifier

  1. Liangyu Chen,
  2. Hang-Xi Li,
  3. Yong Lu,
  4. Christopher W. Warren,
  5. Christian J. Križan,
  6. Sandoko Kosen,
  7. Marcus Rommel,
  8. Shahnawaz Ahmed,
  9. Amr Osman,
  10. Janka Biznárová,
  11. Anita Fadavi Roudsari,
  12. Benjamin Lienhard,
  13. Marco Caputo,
  14. Kestutis Grigoras,
  15. Leif Grönberg,
  16. Joonas Govenius,
  17. Anton Frisk Kockum,
  18. Per Delsing,
  19. Jonas Bylander,
  20. and Giovanna Tancredi
High-fidelity and rapid readout of a qubit state is key to quantum computing and communication, and it is a prerequisite for quantum error correction. We present a readout scheme for
superconducting qubits that combines two microwave techniques: applying a shelving technique to the qubit that effectively increases the energy-relaxation time, and a two-tone excitation of the readout resonator to distinguish among qubit populations in higher energy levels. Using a machine-learning algorithm to post-process the two-tone measurement results further improves the qubit-state assignment fidelity. We perform single-shot frequency-multiplexed qubit readout, with a 140ns readout time, and demonstrate 99.5% assignment fidelity for two-state readout and 96.9% for three-state readout – without using a quantum-limited amplifier.

Building Blocks of a Flip-Chip Integrated Superconducting Quantum Processor

  1. Sandoko Kosen,
  2. Hang-Xi Li,
  3. Marcus Rommel,
  4. Daryoush Shiri,
  5. Christopher Warren,
  6. Leif Grönberg,
  7. Jaakko Salonen,
  8. Tahereh Abad,
  9. Janka Biznárová,
  10. Marco Caputo,
  11. Liangyu Chen,
  12. Kestutis Grigoras,
  13. Göran Johansson,
  14. Anton Frisk Kockum,
  15. Christian Križan,
  16. Daniel Pérez Lozano,
  17. Graham Norris,
  18. Amr Osman,
  19. Jorge Fernández-Pendás,
  20. Anita Fadavi Roudsari,
  21. Giovanna Tancredi,
  22. Andreas Wallraff,
  23. Christopher Eichler,
  24. Joonas Govenius,
  25. and Jonas Bylander
We have integrated single and coupled superconducting transmon qubits into flip-chip modules. Each module consists of two chips – one quantum chip and one control chip –
that are bump-bonded together. We demonstrate time-averaged coherence times exceeding 90μs, single-qubit gate fidelities exceeding 99.9%, and two-qubit gate fidelities above 98.6%. We also present device design methods and discuss the sensitivity of device parameters to variation in interchip spacing. Notably, the additional flip-chip fabrication steps do not degrade the qubit performance compared to our baseline state-of-the-art in single-chip, planar circuits. This integration technique can be extended to the realisation of quantum processors accommodating hundreds of qubits in one module as it offers adequate input/output wiring access to all qubits and couplers.