Three-wave mixing traveling-wave parametric amplifier with periodic variation of the circuit parameters

  1. Anita Fadavi Roudsari,
  2. Daryoush Shiri,
  3. Hampus Renberg Nilsson,
  4. Giovanna Tancredi,
  5. Amr Osman,
  6. Ida-Maria Svensson,
  7. Marina Kudra,
  8. Marcus Rommel,
  9. Jonas Bylander,
  10. Vitaly Shumeiko,
  11. and Per Delsing
We report the implementation of a near-quantum-limited, traveling-wave parametric amplifier that uses three-wave mixing (3WM). To favor amplification by 3WM, we use the superconducting
nonlinear asymmetric inductive element (SNAIL) loops, biased with a dc magnetic flux. In addition, we equip the device with dispersion engineering features to create a stop-band at the second harmonic of the pump and suppress the propagation of the higher harmonics that otherwise degrade the amplification. With a chain of 440 SNAILs, the amplifier provides up to 20 dB gain and a 3-dB bandwidth of 1 GHz. The added noise by the amplifier is found to be less than one photon.

Measurement and control of a superconducting quantum processor with a fully-integrated radio-frequency system on a chip

  1. Mats O. Tholén,
  2. Riccardo Borgani,
  3. Giuseppe Ruggero Di Carlo,
  4. Andreas Bengtsson,
  5. Christian Križan,
  6. Marina Kudra,
  7. Giovanna Tancredi,
  8. Jonas Bylander,
  9. Per Delsing,
  10. Simone Gasparinetti,
  11. and David B. Haviland
We describe a digital microwave platform called Presto, designed for measurement and control of multiple quantum bits (qubits) and based on the third-generation radio-frequency system
on a chip. Presto uses direct digital synthesis to create signals up to 9 GHz on 16 synchronous output ports, while synchronously analyzing response on 16 input ports. Presto has 16 DC-bias outputs, 4 inputs and 4 outputs for digital triggers or markers, and two continuous-wave outputs for synthesizing frequencies up to 15 GHz. Scaling to a large number of qubits is enabled through deterministic synchronization of multiple Presto units. A Python application programming interface configures a firmware for synthesis and analysis of pulses, coordinated by an event sequencer. The analysis integrates template matching (matched filtering) and low-latency (184 – 254 ns) feedback to enable a wide range of multi-qubit experiments. We demonstrate Presto’s capabilities with experiments on a sample consisting of two superconducting qubits connected via a flux-tunable coupler. We show single-shot readout and active reset of a single qubit; randomized benchmarking of single-qubit gates showing 99.972% fidelity, limited by the coherence time of the qubit; and calibration of a two-qubit iSWAP gate.

Robust preparation of Wigner-negative states with optimized SNAP-displacement sequences

  1. Marina Kudra,
  2. Mikael Kervinen,
  3. Ingrid Strandberg,
  4. Shahnawaz Ahmed,
  5. Marco Scigliuzzo,
  6. Amr Osman,
  7. Daniel Pérez Lozano,
  8. Giulia Ferrini,
  9. Jonas Bylander,
  10. Anton Frisk Kockum,
  11. Fernando Quijandría,
  12. Per Delsing,
  13. and Simone Gasparinetti
Hosting non-classical states of light in three-dimensional microwave cavities has emerged as a promising paradigm for continuous-variable quantum information processing. Here we experimentally
demonstrate high-fidelity generation of a range of Wigner-negative states useful for quantum computation, such as Schrödinger-cat states, binomial states, Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill (GKP) states, as well as cubic phase states. The latter states have been long sought after in quantum optics and were never achieved experimentally before. To do so, we use a sequence of interleaved selective number-dependent arbitrary phase (SNAP) gates and displacements. We optimize the state preparation in two steps. First we use a gradient-descent algorithm to optimize the parameters of the SNAP and displacement gates. Then we optimize the envelope of the pulses implementing the SNAP gates. Our results show that this way of creating highly non-classical states in a harmonic oscillator is robust to fluctuations of the system parameters such as the qubit frequency and the dispersive shift.

Stability of superconducting resonators: motional narrowing and the role of Landau-Zener driving of two-level defects

  1. David Niepce,
  2. Jonathan J. Burnett,
  3. Marina Kudra,
  4. Jared H. Cole,
  5. and Jonas Bylander
Frequency instability of superconducting resonators and qubits leads to dephasing and time-varying energy-loss and hinders quantum-processor tune-up. Its main source is dielectric noise
originating in surface oxides. Thorough noise studies are needed in order to develop a comprehensive understanding and mitigation strategy of these fluctuations. Here we use a frequency-locked loop to track the resonant-frequency jitter of three different resonator types—one niobium-nitride superinductor, one aluminium coplanar waveguide, and one aluminium cavity—and we observe strikingly similar random-telegraph-signal fluctuations. At low microwave drive power, the resonators exhibit multiple, unstable frequency positions, which for increasing power coalesce into one frequency due to motional narrowing caused by sympathetic driving of individual two-level-system defects by the resonator. In all three devices we probe a dominant fluctuator, finding that its amplitude saturates with increasing drive power, but its characteristic switching rate follows the power-law dependence of quasiclassical Landau-Zener transitions.

Decoherence benchmarking of superconducting qubits

  1. Jonathan Burnett,
  2. Andreas Bengtsson,
  3. Marco Scigliuzzo,
  4. David Niepce,
  5. Marina Kudra,
  6. Per Delsing,
  7. and Jonas Bylander
We benchmark the decoherence of superconducting qubits to examine the temporal stability of energy-relaxation and dephasing. By collecting statistics during measurements spanning multiple
days, we find the mean parameters T1 = 49 μs and T∗2= 95 μs, however, both of these quantities fluctuate explaining the need for frequent re-calibration in qubit setups. Our main finding is that fluctuations in qubit relaxation are local to the qubit and are caused by instabilities of near-resonant two-level-systems (TLS). Through statistical analysis, we determine switching rates of these TLS and observe the coherent coupling between an individual TLS and a transmon qubit. Finally, we find evidence that the qubit’s frequency stability is limited by capacitance noise. Importantly, this produces a 0.8 ms limit on the pure dephasing which we also observe. Collectively, these findings raise the need for performing qubit metrology to examine the reproducibility of qubit parameters, where these fluctuations could affect qubit gate fidelity.